A World of Images: Photography in the Modern Day

A World of Images: Photography in the Modern Day 1
Young freelancing photographers enjoying traveling and backpacking

It is hard to imagine a world where photography was never invented. In this world, people would still be required to rely solely on their memories, or perhaps in a few circumstances painted or drawn images to preserve a moment of time. It would be a world where newspapers would only have words and after coming back from a trip, one could only recall the special moments in your mind, not in photographs taken while traveling.

Thankfully, this is not the reality, and today photography is more prevalent than ever, with most people snapping numerous shots a day on their cell phones or mobile devices, and looking at countless others when searching online, seeing posters or billboards, or flipping through their favorite magazine. Pictures are everywhere and have become so commonplace that they sometimes fall into the background and aren’t consciously noticed.

So, what is it that makes a photograph stand out? This is something particularly important for businesses to ask, because images are one of the crucial factors to powering success. Imagine a business without images, without pictures to advertise, without a logo design, or without employee photos. Not only do the customers and public quickly lose interest, it is also difficult to get word out in the first place about the services, quality, and mission the business wants to promote.

The photography industry has become one of many facets, no longer just a service reserved for taking portraits of the rich. The fact that many other businesses and industries rely on photographers for success, also means that there is a very high number of business-to-business transactions that involve photographers.

Photographers who work with Localgrapher help individuals and businesses ensure that they have high-quality and unique photographs from locations around the world. Even with so many new technological developments in photography, it is always important to come back to the basics to capture pictures that convey emotion, not only setting. These are the types of pictures people are drawn to; because humans are emotional beings, when someone sees a picture that evokes a particular feeling, they are more likely to remember it.

Businesses can use this quality when promoting their services. Depending on the focus of the business, different emotional responses are desired, and in turn different types of pictures. While technology helps greatly to add the finishing touches to photographs, making sure the lighting is good, and maybe adding some special effects, it lacks what can only be created in the moment and the raw quality that defines good photography.

Photography has come a long way from blurry gray-washed pictures where details are difficult to distinguish. New high-resolution photographs are now possible with many cell phones, and often don’t even require expensive photo equipment. Having photography be accessible for so many people helps to create more connections. From personal vacation photographs to a highway billboard seen by millions of passing drivers, images have the power to create a more integrated network.

In the world of business and photography, it’s important to remember how one image can touch the lives of many people. It could be an important family photograph passed down through generations, or a particularly striking image in a magazine. Years later, someone might think back on a certain image and how it made them feel, bringing up emotions from the past.

Good photographers and good businesses can harness this quality of photographs to create something truly unique for their industry. This can only come with an understanding of the unrepeatable nature of each moment, combined with good use of modern technology to come away from a moment with stunning and unique photographs.

Melissa Thompson writes about a wide range of topics, revealing interesting things we didn’t know before. She is a freelance USA Today producer, and a Technorati contributor.