King is The Light of Nepal


The nation in absence of a King looks like something is missing. The present Nepal seems to me the day without a light. The time has already come that the Nepali people are searching for a light. The King is the light of Nepal.

In Nepalese history, when the King reigned, the people never lost their lives due to hunger. Each and every one had a roof, a piece of cloth and a meal to eat. People were happy to celebrate their festivals with peace of mind. The symbol of peace, the white doves were flying everywhere in the sky. The sounds of a flute and the traditional music (Panche Baja) making all surroundings quiet. The King’s representation carried the reflection of Nepal’s peace and dignity.

Nepal has witnessed a big change but there is no peace, no security and no guarantee of lives. In the name of New Nepal, the leaders uttered rhetoric to fulfill the wishes of the people. Where has that big rhetoric taken us? Is that limited to rhetoric? An announcement of a huge budget to turn Nepal into a prosperous nation has to be implemented in reality.

Nepal is a small and beautiful nation. Its tradition and culture are very rich. To preserve Nepal’s rich culture, tradition and its beauty, Kings have been the divine gift. Even in the epics (Vedas and Puranas) it is stated whenever difficulties arise and faith is in danger, god will come to the rescue. The situation of Nepal resembles the epics. Nepal is in a difficult situation. It is in the verge of disintegration. Unity is about to break. To avoid all this, there is just one credible source in Nepal and that is – the King.

To be a true observer, it is possible only if you are away from home. I might have not been a true observer if I had been in the country. The nation with a King is far better than in his absence. With him, Nepalese are safe, with him Nepalese are united, and with him Nepalese and Nepal are secured forever.

After all, the King is the light of Nepal.

Kamala Prasai, from Nepal, now in New York, is a Lyricist and Writer, who has published five books of Nepali poems and plays.