Suicide Attack Kills Nine in Afghanistan

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Nine Afghans were killed and scores of innocent civilians were injured as a suicide bomber blew up a car full of explosives near the Indian consulate in Afghanistan’s Jalalabad city.

Reports say the deadly blast had destroyed several houses and shops. The three attackers were also killed.

Most of the casualties were children who were reportedly attending religious classes in the city.

Terror attacks had struck India in the past. In October 2009, a Taliban suicide bomber attacked the Indian embassy in Kabul, killing at least 17 people.

kabul
U.S. Army providing security in 2011 while ANP officers conduct routine vehicle inspections at Freedom Circle in the heart of downtown Kabul. Phoro: Wikimedia Commons

US condemns the attack

US Department Spokesperson Jen Psaki has expressed condemnation against the deadly attack.

The United States condemns in strongest terms the attack near the Indian consulate in Jalalabad, which took the lives of innocent civilians including women and children.

Ms. Psaki extends her deepest condolences to the families of those killed in this senseless attack.

She adds that despite today’s attack, the US government remains committed to working with our Afghan, Indian, and other international partners to build a secure and prosperous Afghanistan free from senseless violence.

US and Afghanistan Partnership

Both nations have worked together to set forth a long-term political, diplomatic, and security partnership, and it entered into force just a few days ago.

The US government sees this alliance as a powerful symbol of its commitment to Afghanistan’s future.

The United States also wants to continue to invest in doing what the Afghans believe they need.

The United States will continue to protect Afghanistan from any efforts by insurgents and outsiders to destabilize Afghanistan.

The US government has supported President Karzai in his effort to have an Afghan-owned, Afghan-led reconciliation process.

In December 2011, the United States withdrew 10,000 U.S. troops from Afghanistan.

July 2011 marked the beginning of a responsible transition that will see Afghan forces gradually taking the lead in securing their own country.

By 2014, the process of transition will be complete, and the Afghan people will be responsible for their own security.

The Afghan security forces move into the lead, the United States continues to reduce its military footprint. Its mission will change from combat to support. The remaining 23,000 “surge” troops in December 2009 will leave Afghanistan by the end of summer 2012.

The U.S. government has made significant progress towards their goals as well.

Reports say the U.S. government is redoubling its efforts to pursue a peaceful end to the conflict in the region.

The U.S. government has taken tangible steps to advance Afghan reconciliation and reintegration initiatives, including support to the Afghan High Peace Council and provincial police and reintegration councils.

Mina Fabulous follows the news, especially what is going on in the US State Department. Mina turns State Department waffle into plain English. Mina Fabulous is the pen name of Carmen Avalino, the NewsBlaze production editor. When she isn’t preparing stories for NewsBlaze writers, she writes stories, but to separate her editing and writing identities, she uses the name given by her family and friends.