Social Network and Glee Sweep 2011 Golden Globes

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Known worldwide for its glittering Golden Globe Awards ceremony held every January and its multi-million dollar donations to charity, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association had humble origins that stemmed solely from a group of journalists’ desire to efficiently and accurately cover all aspects of the world of entertainment.

Today’s organization has its roots in the early 1940s when Pearl Harbor had drawn America into World War II. Audiences, hungry for diversion, were seeking out films offering escape, inspiration and entertainment; and filmmakers including Orson Welles, Preston Sturges, Darryl Zanuck and Michael Curtiz were working hard to fulfill the need. Amid the turmoil of war and the difficulties with communications, a handful of Los Angeles-based overseas journalists banded together to share contacts, information and material.

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Image: Kate Capshaw, Steven Spielberg, Rita Wilson and Tom Hanks attend the 68th Annual Golden Globes Awards at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, CA on Sunday, January 16, 2011. A(c) 2011, HFPA.

The idea was not a new one: previously, in 1928 the Hollywood Association of Foreign Correspondents (HAFCO) had been formed and, in 1935, the Foreign Press Society appeared. Both were short-lived, although the HAFCO had a brief moment in the spotlight when Charlie Chaplin, Mary Pickford and other celebrities showed up at an International Ball the group organized at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel.

In 1943 the journalists, led by the correspondent for Britain’s Daily Mail, formed the Hollywood Foreign Correspondents Association and conceived the motto “Unity Without Discrimination of Religion or Race.” It was an uphill struggle at first as the film industry had not yet realized the importance of foreign markets. At first the members held informal gatherings in private homes. As the membership grew, HFPA meetings were held in larger quarters, with the association selecting the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel as the location for group functions.

As representatives of the world press, the group’s members felt it was incumbent upon them to give their audience their judgments as to Hollywood’s finest productions. The organization’s first awards presentation for distinguished achievements in the film industry took place in early 1944 with an informal ceremony at 20th Century Fox. There, Jennifer Jones was awarded Best Actress honors for “The Song of Bernadette,” which also won for Best Film, while Paul Lukas took home Best Actor laurels for “Watch on the Rhine. Awards were presented in the form of scrolls.

In 1955 the Golden Globes began honoring achievements in television as well as in film. The first honorees in the Best Television Show category that year were Dinah Shore, Lucy & Desi,” “The American Comedy” and “Davy Crockett.” In 2007, The Golden Globes initiated the category “Best Animated Feature Film” and the first year nominees were “Cars,” “Happy Feet” and “Monster House.”

Today, the Golden Globes recognize achievements in 25 categories, reports celebrity artist Victor Issa; 14 in motion pictures and 11 in television. Dick Clark Productions has produced the Golden Globes ceremony since 1983. The awards now have the distinction of being one of the three most-watched award shows on television. On Sunday, January 16th, 2011, the 68th Annual Golden Globes Awards were held at The Beverly Hills Hotel. Despite the shows relatively unknown host for a second year in a row, who got more sneers than cheers from the audience, the actual stars among the show proved entertaining.

Cecil B. DeMille Award

Robert De Niro

Best Motion Picture – Drama

The Social Network

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture, Drama

Natalie Portman: Black Swan

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture, Drama

Colin Firth: The King’s Speech

Best Motion Picture Comedy Or Musical

Burlesque

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture, Comedy Or Musical

Annette Bening: The Kids Are All Right

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical

Paul Giamatti: Barney’s Version

Best Performance by an Actress In A Supporting Role in a Motion Picture

Melissa Leo: The Fighter

Best Performance by an Actor In A Supporting Role in a Motion Picture

Christian Bale: The Fighter

Best Animated Feature Film

Toy Story 3

Best Foreign Language Film

In A Better World (Denmark)

Best Director, Motion Picture

David Fincher: The Social Network

Best Screenplay, Motion Picture

Aaron Sorkin: The Social Network

Best Original Score, Motion Picture

Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross: The Social Network

Best Original Song, Motion Picture

You Haven’t Seen The Last Of Me: Burlesque

Music & Lyrics By: Diane Warren

Best Television Series, Drama

Boardwalk Empire (HBO)

Best Performance by an Actress In A Television Series, Drama

Katey Sagal: Sons Of Anarchy

Best Performance by an Actor In A Television Series, Drama

Steve Buscemi: Boardwalk Empire (HBO)

Best Television Series, Comedy Or Musical

Glee (FOX)

Best Performance by an Actress In A Television Series, Comedy Or Musical

Laura Linney: The Big C (Showtime)

Best Performance by an Actor In A Television Series, Comedy Or Musical

Jim Parsons: The Big Bang Theory (CBS)

Best Mini Series Or Motion Picture Made for Television

Carlos (Sundance Channel)

Best Performance by an Actress In A Mini Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Claire Danes: Temple Grandin (HBO)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Mini Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Al Pacino: You Don’t Know Jack (HBO)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Jane Lynch: Glee (FOX)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Chris Colfer: Glee (FOX)

All world rights reserved.

Victor Issa is a renown artist that creates busts and life size sculptures of some of the biggest stars on the planet. For more information, visit

VictorIssa.com