Women Often Overlooked in Conflict Resolution


Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton today stressed that women bear the brunt of a lot of conflict and they’re often overlooked in conflict resolution during an interview with PBS’s Gini Reticker for “Women, War and Peace” Series

During the interview, Ms. Clinton highlighted that in today’s wars around the world, the primary victims are women and children.

“It didn’t used to be that way when there was a more organized military campaign. But today, we see women being victimized in great numbers all over, in every conflict.” -Ms. Clinton

She stated that she believes that there’s a need to have women actively involved; their voices need to be heard, they need to be in positions of responsibility and authority.

Ms. Clinton stated that the United States has set forth three redline conditions that have to be part of the outcomes in Afghnistan: Number one, they have to renounce violence, they have to break ties with al-Qaida, and they have to respect the constitution and laws of Afghanistan

“And again, the primary victims would likely be women and children in the absence of some kind of sustainable resolution.” -Ms. Clinton

She highlighted that it’s going to be one of her highest priorities to argue for and ensure that rights and the security of women are respected.

“I feel that it is part of my responsibility to do all that I can to ensure that whatever the United States is part of in trying to resolve this conflict, we do nothing that undermines the gains that have been made for women. Now, obviously, that will be easier to do if women are actually involved in the peace jirgas, in the high peace councils, at the international conferences. And so I am working very hard to make sure that happens as well.” -Ms. Clinton

Mina Fabulous follows the news, especially what is going on in the US State Department. Mina turns State Department waffle into plain English. Mina Fabulous is the pen name of Carmen Avalino, the NewsBlaze production editor. When she isn’t preparing stories for NewsBlaze writers, she writes stories, but to separate her editing and writing identities, she uses the name given by her family and friends.