15 Somali Pirates to Face Trial in Seychelles


Seychelles today accepted 15 Somali pirates from U.S. military costudy for prosecution.

The Somali pirates were allegedly reported to attack a merchant ship and the abduction of 13 Iranian fishermen.

The Iranian fishermen were rescued by the by the U.S. Navy on January 5.

The acceptance of those suspected pirates from the US Forces follows the agreement between President James Michel and the US secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, that the United States would continue to boost Seychelles’ capacity in the battle against piracy.

The United States of America today welcome today’s decision by the island nation to accept the captured Somali pirates for prosecution.

US Department Spokesperson Victoria Nuland reports that the individuals join more than 1,060 other suspected pirates facing justice in more than 20 countries.

The sinking of Ekawat Nava 5 on November 18, 2008 by the Indian Navy warship INS Tabar.

“We appreciate the Seychelles’ regional leadership on counter-piracy, as seen in their willingness to prosecute and incarcerate Somali pirates, as well as their plans to host a regional intelligence coordination center to support future piracy prosecutions.” -Ms. Nuland

She stresses that the successful resolution of the incident marks a positive step forward for building a strong and unified international response against piracy originating from Somalia and for promoting freedom of navigation worldwide.

Seychelles has offered to host a regional prosecution center, given sufficient prison capacity to imprison convicted pirates, amounting to 20% of its total prison capacity. The crowded prison represents a huge burden on the prison system and restricts Seychelles capacity to incarcerate Somali pirates.

On February 2011, the United Nations launched an action plan to combat piracy off the Somali coast, calling for greater support from national navies to fight a “global menace” that threatens not only international trade but the world body’s delivery of vital food aid to millions of hungry people.

On 2010, 286 piracy-related incidents off the coast of Somalia were reported, resulting in 67 hijacked ships, with 1,130 seafarers on board; while a recent study estimated the cost to the world economy from disruptions to international trade at between $7 billion and $12 billion.

Mina Fabulous follows the news, especially what is going on in the US State Department. Mina turns State Department waffle into plain English. Mina Fabulous is the pen name of Carmen Avalino, the NewsBlaze production editor. When she isn’t preparing stories for NewsBlaze writers, she writes stories, but to separate her editing and writing identities, she uses the name given by her family and friends.