Apotheosis! A Sobbing Father George and a Daughter’s STONE-COLD Stare!

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I’m testing Beethoven’s 5th today. It’s a fit with George Anthony’s biorhythms. His proclivity towards emotional swings, highs and lows, or flurries of anger, followed by seas of grief and sorrow, or just plain bad luck that comes his way.

Human expressions conveyed in a court room mirrored on a musical score, a romantic who was gripped with extraordinary irascible passions himself.

Whether it’s Jose Baez trying to fluster him (this is easily done) or his daughter, who went south many moons ago, George has his reasons for believing his predicament is ill-fated and troubling.

Yet he holds his own yesterday with Mr. Baez’s piercing questioning. And his outbursts of sobbing may be aptly interpreted as a sign of strength.

That is, George is only human. He loved his granddaughter, and as of July 15th, 2008, he is confronted with the possibility that his own flesh and blood may have killed Caylee.

To pinpoint an exact moment when this chilling realization came over him, is an inexact science. My best guess is the horror came at Johnson’s Towing, when he smelled ‘human decomposition.’

George hears the buzz-saw racket of feeding swarms of maggots, and opens the trunk of the white Pontiac Firebird to make sure two bodies were not inside.

This is the defining moment when all his thoughts welled up, the incident with the gas can, his daughter’s erratic behavior, the partying, her rapid departure with Caylee on the afternoon of June 16th, 2008.

“My daughter has a tendency to live on the edge.” The problem is that George must relive these events over and over again, ad infinitum, for the remainder of his days. The tape loop plays in his head and can’t be turned off.

This is a form of madness, if I’ve ever seen one. You could sense it yesterday with his recall of the ‘gas can incident,’ where Casey slams the fookin’ gas cans down on the ground by the rear of the Firebird (July 24th, 2008).

george and casey

The question of sexual abuse of Casey by George (sometime in the remote past) keeps coming up. I don’t think it happened, ever. George is telling the truth on this front.

What I see is other issues, that may have contributed to Casey’s obvious deviant behavior. George’s philandering may have colored Casey’s behavioral development and caused an apparent hatred between father and daughter.

I believe this to be a fairly common phenomenon in families, but for some unknown reason, it becomes protracted, exaggerated to extremes in the Anthony’s from Orlando.

Why this is I can’t say for sure. I will assert, however, this is the key to this homicide. Casey hates her father; this was obvious in the ways she coldly stared at him, while he cried his eyes out, at the constant resurfacing of unpleasant memories, that are alive in perpetuity!

The motive for murder is a revenge factor against her father. Theoretical yes, but tossed it around for a moment or two and see if it sticks. The prosecution believes the motive is a troubled mother/daughter relationship. I will contradict this.

It was rather a serious breach between Casey and George that gets at the heart of this saga. This is the real reason why George tried to commit suicide. He knew (intuitively) that Casey killed her own daughter to exact revenge on him.

George breaking down in tears, with a cold killer turning him to stone with piercing glares (such as Medusa could), was the apotheosis of the trial. One furtive glance captures the whole ball of wax.