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More Questions Than Answers According to Jodi Arias Jury

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With the state resting their case and the jury sent to a short recess until the 29th of January, questions of a possible mistrial or full dismissal of the case are not the only ones unanswered. According to questions raised by the Jodi Arias jury and members of the past testimony called by the state, they may have more questions than answers themselves.

Jodi Arias is on trial for stabbing her former boyfriend Travis Alexander 29 times, slashing his throat and then shooting him in the face before leaving him in his bathroom stall to be found days later by friends.

In the state of Arizona where this case is taking place, jurors are allowed to submit questions to the called individuals after they have given their testimony. After listening to Detective Eteban Flores of the Mesa Police Department they asked questions regarding the roommates of Travis Alexander; questioning factors such as whether they "show(ed) concern" about his absence and whether their alibis were reviewed.

Flores responded saying Alexander had recently planned a vacation to Mexico and the roommates thought he was there. As to their whereabouts at the time of the tragedy, Flores was able to say one was house sitting with his girlfriend and the other was at work. Already the roommates had publicly discussed the fact that it was not uncommon for Alexander to be away for long periods of time in the past.

It is not known whether the questions have alarmed the prosecution but if they are, it is not just the questions they should worry about but the timing. Flores was given these questions eight days after evidence and testimony showed Arias' months long consistent lies regarding her involvement in the tragedy.

If convicted, Arias could face the death penalty.

A New York Native, Heather is our resident Nancy Grace regarding national court and crime issues. She has a Masters Degree in Law as well as a Bachelors in Political Science. Her crime blog can be found at www.BachmanontheBench.com. Read more stories by Heather Piedmont.

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