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Quartet Film Review

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Love and Opera Are in the Air in Romantic Dramedy Directed by Dustin Hoffman

Sometimes a gem of a movie slips through the cracks that really has no business getting lost. Such is the case with Quartet, a delightful dramedy directed by Dustin Hoffman and starring Maggie Smith.

Since the film was released in late December by the esteemed Weinstein Company, one would naturally expect it to generate a lot of Academy Award buzz. But it was overlooked entirely, which means moviegoers might now be tempted to pass on the picture in favor of Oscar contenders. I just hope audiences don't dismiss Quartet because it lacks the Academy's stamp of approval.

The story is set at Beecham House, a sprawling estate in England which serves as a retirement home for accomplished classical musicians. At the point of departure, we are introduced to three of its residents Wilfred (Billy Connolly), Cecily (Pauline Collins) and Reginald (Tom Courtenay), opera singers who once shared the limelight as members of a famed quartet.

Quartet Film

Melancholy Reggie is rather reserved in contrast to the comic relief coming courtesy of slightly senile Cissy and ladies man Wilf, a frisky codger quick to flirt with anything in a skirt. Otherwise, Beecham House is busy preparing to put on an annual concert, staged each year on Verdi's birthday.

The plot thickens when Jean Horton (Smith), a very demanding, former diva, moves in unannounced. For not only was she responsible for the breakup of the aforementioned quartet, but the adulteress was also to blame for the failure of her brief marriage to Reggie.

Jean is so narcissistic that she's initially oblivious to the effect that her arrival is having on her ex, who ostensibly never fully recovered from their divorce. Instead, she spends her time complaining about having to adjust to the relatively modest circumstances.

Will the two reconcile, let alone be able to even share the same space? And can the quartet be reunited to perform as headliners at the recital, a fundraiser suddenly critical to Beecham's remaining afloat? These are the pivotal concerns that will keep you entertained and engaged every step of the way to the glorious resolution.

A charming, romantic romp revolving around a couple of unexpected encores.

Excellent (4 stars)

Rated PG-13 for suggestive humor and brief profanity

Running time: 98 minutes

Distributor: The Weinstein Company

To see a trailer for Quartet:

Kam Williams is a syndicated film and book critic who writes for 100+ publications. He is a member of the New York Film Critics Online, the African-American Film Critics Association, and the NAACP Image Awards Nominating Committee. Contact him through NewsBlaze. Read more reviews by Kam Williams.

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