Daily News header

The Price of The Ticket Book Review

By     get stories by email

"Barack Obama's triumph in the presidential election of 2008... contains an irony: he won a victory as an African-American only by denying that he was the candidate of African-Americans... Obama's very success exacted a heavy cost on black politics...

His election undermined the very movement that made it possible... The social problems targeted by an earlier generation of black politicians-racial disparities in income and education, stratospheric incarceration and unemployment rates, rampant HIV in black communities-all persist, yet Obama's election marginalized them." - Excerpted from the book jacket

All you have to do is take a quick look at the black dropout, unemployment, health insurance and home foreclosure rates to know that the election of Barack Obama hasn't transformed America into a post-racial paradise quite yet. What is even more troubling is the suggestion that the Age of Obama might actually have ushered in an era marked by a reversal of fortune for most African-Americans.

ticket

That's precisely the case being made by Frederick C. Harris, a Professor of Political Science at Columbia University, in The Price of the Ticket: Barack Obama and the Rise and Decline of Black Politics. This groundbreaking book assesses the state of African-American affairs through the prism of a revised, 21st Century paradigm.

It is this author's contention that "black voters have struck a bargain with Obama" whereby they feign satisfaction with his ignoring the African-American agenda in exchange for "the symbol of a black president and family in the White House." And he concludes that a "dispiriting silence" is the price that the black community has had to pay as a consequence.

Unafraid of stepping on Obama's toes, Professor Harris indicts the President for currying favor with whites by blaming poor blacks for their lot in life. For instance, he quotes this speech in which Obama describes poverty as resulting, in part, from moral failings: "Don't tell me it doesn't have a little to do with the fact that we have too many daddies not acting like daddies."

In the end, the author wonders whether the sacrifices made by generations of African-American ancestors in the name of freedom and equality might have been in vain, if the President who's finally led the people to the Promised Land could care less about delivering hope and change.

To order a copy of The Price of the Ticket, visit: AMAZON

The Price of the Ticket:

Barack Obama and the Rise and Decline of Black Politics

by Frederick C. Harris

Oxford University Press

Hardcover, $24.95

228 pages

ISBN: 978-0-19-973967-7

Kam Williams is a syndicated film and book critic who writes for 100+ publications. He is a member of the New York Film Critics Online, the African-American Film Critics Association, and the NAACP Image Awards Nominating Committee. Contact him through NewsBlaze. Read more reviews by Kam Williams.

  Please click this get stories by email button to be notified about future stories, and please leave a comment below.

  Please leave a comment here     If it does not display within 10 seconds, please refresh the page

Related Book Publishing News

Karin Slaughter discusses her latest opus, Cop Town, a riveting murder mystery set in Atlanta in 1974, and tells us what inspired her to write it.
45 year-old pop icon Jennifer Lopez has been in the limelight for a couple decades, and her life has at times been splashed across the tabloids...
In 1883, she was arrested for refusing to give up her seat on a train, an experience that she chronicled in her first published piece. Though Wells achieved success as a writer, editor and even co-owner of a newspaper, her greatest accomplishments c
Jeff Chang tackles deep and consequential subject-matter and shares profound insights on such themes as the rise of Obama, multiculturalism and gentrification.
Born and raised on a rough side of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Dr. William Henry Cosby, Jr. overcame a challenging childhood to enjoy a 50+ year career in show business.
Brian Moran, a lawyer, contends that the American Dream has been hijacked by what he calls hyper-incarceration, that puts one in three black juveniles into prison.

 

NewsBlaze Writers Of The Month


Popular Stories This Month

newsletter logo

landing page ad

NewsBlaze
Copyright © 2004-2014 NewsBlaze Pty. Ltd.
Use of this website is subject to our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy  | DMCA Notice               Press Room   |    Visit NewsBlaze Mobile Site