Daily News header

Naval Sea Cadets Train at Atterbury

By

EDINBURG, Ind. -Thirty teenagers from all over the United States got a taste of what real special operations training is like at Camp Atterbury Joint Maneuver Training Center, during the United States Navy Sea Cadets' Urban Counterinsurgency Training Program (or UCOIN, as it is commonly called by cadets,) June 22 to July 1.

The cadets participating in the training, all between the ages of 14 and 18, were selected from a pool of over 200 applicants after going through a stringent interview process as well as a physical fitness test to determine which cadets were the most mentally and physically prepared for such intense training.

"This training is very realistic. We have real instructors from various parts of the special operations community teaching these kids real tactics," said Navy Lt. John Grounds, commanding officer, Urban Counterinsurgency Training Contingent. "It's tailored specifically for youth that are interested in joining the special operations community after high school."


Sea Cadet Bobby Rombach, of San Diego, Calif., leads his squad through a simulated village assault during Urban Counterinsurgency Training at Camp Atterbury Joint Maneuver Training Center.
Photo: Sgt. 1st Class Matt Scotten, Atterbury-Muscatatuck Public Affairs

In true special operations form, the training is extremely demanding. Cadets are subjected to as much as 15 miles of marching while carrying as much as 60 pounds of gear. They learn and practice skills such as field medicine, hand-to-hand combat, advanced marksmanship, urban warfare tactics, room-clearing, breaching, interrogation and much more.

According to Grounds, the fact that Atterbury is a mobilization site made it ideal for UCOIN because the facilities are designed with the contemporary operating environment in mind.

"We wanted to give these cadets the new stuff; the most up-to-date training, and Atterbury was able to help us make that happen" said Grounds. "Atterbury is also very centrally located, since we have cadets coming from all over the country from Texas to Maine and from Rhode Island to Florida."


Sea Cadet Josh Witte, of Indianapolis, leads his team through a simulated village assault during Urban Counterinsurgency Training.
Photo: Sgt. 1st Class Matt Scotten, Atterbury-Muscatatuck Public Affairs

Grounds added that the staff at Atterbury was extremely accommodating, giving them fairly unrestricted access to all of the training areas and equipment they could possibly need, which was important because cadets were being taught so many ideas, skills and tactics in such a short amount of time.

"It's hard for someone who is 15-16 years old to grasp all the concepts we are pushing at them as fast as we are pushing it at them. 99% of kids would probably have already quit by now," said Grounds. "We are coming closer to the end of the training cycle for them and right now they are tired and dirty and sore, but they keep on going. This is a pretty tough group."


Sea Cadets Tyler Olson, of Polaris, Minn. (front), and Kevin Cassidy of Indianapolis, provide security as the rest of their team searches buildings while conducting a simulated village assault during Urban Counterinsurgency Training.
Photo: Sgt. 1st Class Matt Scotten, Atterbury-Muscatatuck Public Affairs.

"Not many people ever get to do this," said Mac Roberts, 17, from Coronado, Cali. "I know my friends are sitting at home relaxing and going to parties. I just finished flying around in a Blackhawk helicopter and securing a landing zone. I think my summer has been way better than theirs."

UCOIN is not all about flying around in helicopters and firing weapons. When asked what the best part of the training was, every single cadet interviewed said the same thing as Michael Morita, 17, of San Diego, Cali.

"This is all about teamwork and learning to come together as a group," said Morita. "Sure, the training is realistic and the instructors are amazing, but the team we have built together here while we were at Camp Atterbury is the part that I think will stick with me."

For more information on Urban Counterinsurgency Training and the United States Naval Sea Cadets, go to their website at http://www.usnsccatterbury.us/index.html.


Sea Cadet Wyatt Chaudion, of Crane, Ind., maintains control of a captured prisoner while conducting a simulated village assault during Urban Counterinsurgency Training.
Photo: Sgt. 1st Class Matt Scotten, Atterbury-Muscatatuck Public Affairs
CAPTIONS: 120628-A-CP678-033 -


Sea Cadet Michael Morita, of San Diego, keeps a watchful eye over a secured landing zone from the cover of a tree line.
Photo: Sgt. 1st Class Matt Scotten, Atterbury-Muscatatuck Public Affairs


Sea Cadet Jacob Hinsley, of Knoxville, Tenn., maintains security while the rest of his team evacuates a simulated casualty from the scene of a helicopter crash.
Photo: Sgt. 1st Class Matt Scotten, Atterbury-Muscatatuck Public Affairs)


Sea Cadets between the ages of 14-18 secure a landing zone after dismounting a Blackhawk helicopter.
Photo: Sgt. 1st Class Matt Scotten, Atterbury-Muscatatuck Public Affairs

  Please leave a comment here     If it does not display within 10 seconds, please refresh the page

Related Support Our Troops, Read Their Stories News

In addition to reacting to multiple training scenarios focused on containing situations quickly and with minimal force, Soldiers gained a solid understanding of the different equipment and capabilities.
Maj. Kopczynski will succeed Lt. Col. Marcus Thomas, who has served as the director since March, 2010.
Problems addressed by the students included topics such as the correlation between sleep and grades, eye color and the ability to see colors, or the effects of genetically modified organisms.
It can be difficult to give time, money and resources, but Soldiers in a local Army unit manage to do all that for a good cause.
Both Soldiers were attending a funeral for a fellow combat veteran when an accident occurred at a nearby intersection. They heard the crash while outside the funeral and immediately went into action.
Candidates for the SAMC spent numerous hours committing themselves in preparing for the board proceedings. Being a member of the SAMC is about being a strong disciplined leader that positively represents the U.S. Army.

 

NewsBlaze Writers Of The Month


Popular Stories This Month

newsletter logo

landing page ad

NewsBlaze
Copyright © 2004-2014 NewsBlaze Pty. Ltd.
Use of this website is subject to our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy  | DMCA Notice               Press Room   |    Visit NewsBlaze Mobile Site