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Good Deeds Movie Review

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This is Tyler Perry's twelfth film and, as his core audience is already lined up eagerly awaiting its release, success at the box office is guaranteed. Unfortunately, this guarantee seems to have negated Mr. Perry's need to produce anything worth watching and, in the event, he deigned to dish up a sloppy melodrama that even his fans might struggle to enjoy.

Wesley Deeds (Tyler Perry) is CEO of the company his father left to him and his younger brother, Walt (Brian White). Walt resents his brother's s higher power and is antagonistic towards everyone, particularly his widowed mother Wilimena (Phylicia Rashad) and Wesley's fiancée, Natalie (Gabrielle Union).

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Meanwhile, Lindsey (Thandie Newton) is doing her best to take care of her 6-year-old daughter, Ariel (Jordenn Thompson), but is struggling under the weight of her responsibilities. She works on the cleaning crew in Wesley's firm and, when she is forced to bring her daughter to work with her, Wesley comes to her aid.

Despite the fact that Lindsey has been working in the same building as Wesley and Walt for some time, she appears to have no idea what either of her bosses actually look like. This is too silly to even comment on but, on the up-side, it does serve as a warning for what is to come; pretty soon, the unlikely follows the incredible, with the plain ridiculous close on its heels. When Lindsey turns up with a brand new Harley and two matching biker jackets, her blithe explanation is just another idea that's been grabbed out of the air, with no thought given as to how it got there or when it should leave.

The behavior of the characters in this film is equally unreal. Wesley is always super-patient, super-kind and super-thoughtful, while Walt is always very bad tempered, very egotistical and very rude. The other characters are equally flawed or unflawed and, apart from being pretty boring, they all cry too much. Obviously Lindsey is beset with problems, so it's OK for her to sob her way through, but there's absolutely no good reason for anyone else to blubber, not least because they're all stinking rich. The final tear-filled scene with Wesley and his mother is particularly irritating. All that's happening is he's going on holiday to Africa, so why would anyone be crying about that, unless they absolutely hate Africa?

Staying true to the 'unlikely scenarios' theme, the break-up between Wesley and his fiancé (that's technically a spoiler but you'd guess anyway so it doesn't count) has got to be the most civilized break-up in movie history. Neither of them are blinkered, no one yells and, wait for it, no one blames anyone for a darn thing. Can you imagine anything less real? Well, actually, yes, that comes a few minutes later, when Wesley tells Natalie to keep the ring he gave her, which is a diamond the size of a golf ball. If you think this is a tad unrealistic, and that men have probably hacked off ex's fingers for less, you probably need to rosy up those glasses a little and watch a few more Tyler Perry films.

Good Deeds Trailer:

RELEASE DATE
USA - 24 February 2012

To read more reviews by Miv Evans please click her pic. Contact Miv at www.thetrailerfestival.com

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