Daily News header

Cthulhu DVD Review: Lovecraft Lives In Haunting Dirge

By     get stories by email

With a title nearly impossible to pronounce and even less likely to spell correctly, Cthulhu is an equally enigmatic though affectionate and masterfully macabre nod to H.P. Lovecraft flights of freakish fantasy on the page. First time director Dan Gildark has an astonishing, visually potent sense of just how those sorts of haunting, surreal landscapes and nightmarish internal mindscapes can merge to effectively transport viewers to multiple chilling alternative realities.

Jason Cottle is Russell Marsh in Ctulhu, a moody gay Seattle professor who returns to his long estranged patrician family and boyhood town of Rivermouth on the remote coast of Oregon, when he learns that his mother has passed away. Clearly at odds with his harsh and peculiar father Reverend Marsh (Dennis Kleinsmith) who turns up in a purple jumpsuit at Mom's wake, Russell does his best to avoid family gatherings during his hopefully short stay. Instead, he wanders around town, visiting old haunts that dredge up distant memories morphing into frightening occult encounters.

And apparently no ordinary reverend, Dad heads a secretive New Age doomsday cult called Esoteric Order of Dago, which terrified locals fear may be linked to the disappearance of many of the residents. The followers are also reported to worship a supernatural amphibian human creature known as Cthulhu.

While escalating reports of the ongoing disintegration of the planet, including sightings of Eskimo terrorists, are casually broadcast on radio and television, Russell intermittently butts heads with ghosts and other seriously creepy entities. He also takes time out to consummate a potential romance only intimated decades ago with a boyhood pal who is now divorced. And while Tori Spelling who plays an aggressively seductive babe with the hots for Russell and a wheelchair-ridden invalid spouse, chases him all around town until she corners the gay dude and rapes him.

Cthulhu is far scarier than it sounds, and the filmmaker effectively locks down a literally captive audience. And though the emotional interludes between the characters unnecessarily drag and distract at times, the eerie images of the mystical, tempestuous Oregon coast are both stunning and nerve shredding for the entire bewitching duration.

Ryko Distribution
Rated R
3 stars

DVD Features: Text/Photo Galleries; Trailers.

Prairie Miller is a multimedia journalist online, in print and on radio. Contact her through NewsBlaze.

  Please click this get stories by email button to be notified about future stories, and please leave a comment below.

  Please leave a comment here     If it does not display within 10 seconds, please refresh the page

Related Movie Reviews News

Directed by Pat O'Connor (Sweet November), the screen version is an intriguing romance drama which takes a sharp turn about midway through when Tommo and Charlie enlist in the army and ship off to serve their country in Flanders' fields.
Before the month of October ends, here are the must-see movies to give viewers thrills and chills on the Halloween weekends.
Kam Williams interviews Haley Joel Osment, who played Cole, in The Sixth Sense, as the boy with the iconic line, I see dead people. Now in Sex Ed.
Seemingly a satire in some ways, of Keaton's ambivalent transformation into Tim Burton's Batman a quarter of a century ago, Birdman appears to be Keaton's venture into unprecedented extreme acting.
For movie fanatics and couch potatoes, are you ready to relax and indulge in a stress-free weekend? Well, here are top 10 DVD releases for the week!
It's a movie marathon, and here are some must-see movies to shoo away the boredom and be on trend on what's new and hot flicks for this month!

 

NewsBlaze Writers Of The Month



Popular Stories This Month

newsletter logo

NewsBlaze
Copyright © 2004-2014 NewsBlaze Pty. Ltd.
Use of this website is subject to our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy  | DMCA Notice               Press Room   |    Visit NewsBlaze Mobile Site