Millions of Foreigners in India

512

Bangladesh is Poor India’s woe. Famine in Bangladesh and its effect in North-East India as incessant immigration continues unabated

India has well-protected international boundaries. The Northern boundary is totally surrounded by the invincible world’s big mountain, ‘Himalaya’. More than 50% (per cent) of the Western boundary is protected by the Arabian Sea, while another 50% (per cent) Eastern border is covered by the Bay of Bengal Sea and the Southern side is fully besieged by the Indian Ocean. Although, likewise the blue-hills of Arunachal Pradesh, Nagaland and the Patkai range protect about 50% (per cent) of the Eastern boundary. The erstwhile East Pakistan, that is, former East Bengal, known as Purba Banga has turned into present ‘Bangladesh’ is curved out as a new international border with India in the East-South fringe.

Bangladesh is the fourth largest peasant society in the world, but its landlessness is gradually rising day by day, which is faster rate than its population growth, forcing migration that will spill over into India, specially, Eastern Indian States – Assam, West-Bengal, Tripura, Meghalaya, Mizoram, including Arunachal Pradesh, Nagaland, Manipur, Sikkim and Bihar.

Right up to 1989, the Indo-Bangladesh international border was quite open. As per 1991 Census Report of Bangladesh (CRB), her population was 10,79,92,140 and in 1996, the population was 11,99,57,313. There was no exaggeration in the figures, but if anyone takes into confidence the statistics of the ‘Electoral Roll’ (which is locally called Voter Talika or Voter List) of Bangladesh as published on 7th October, 1995. According to this electoral roll Bangladesh has 5,60,16,178 voters, which is 61,65,567 less than that of 1991 Roll. In 1991, she had 6,21,81,745 voters. Bangladesh is the world’s most densely populated country, with a density of 969 per square kilometre.

Bangladeshi figure has soared from 624 (in 1981) to 969 (in 1991) within a single decade. Moreover, the Election Commission of Bangladesh (ECB) has de-franchised 20,00,000 voters on the ground of their long absence in the country and their names were deleted from the electoral roll of 1995. This action is against the ‘Constitution of Bangladesh’ under Articles 119 and 122 respectively.

On the other hand, as per the news given by Rahaman Jahangir (a news correspondent from Ananda Bazar Patrika in West Bengal, India – published on 28th May, 1996), the ECB, in their pre-election time of 1996 deleted as many as 12,00,000 voters (who were working in foreign countries) from their voter-list, on the grounds that the illegal infiltrators in India may claim to enlist their names in their voter-list, if this is done. This decision was taken by ECB before the Bangladesh Parliamentary Election on 12th June, 1996.

According to a high official in the Bangladesh Commission, they would face political criticism if they enlist those voters in their present voter-list.

So, to avoid criticism and the opposition of political parties, the ECB turned down the proposal of enlisting the names of the Bangladeshis in their voter-list. The Government of Bangladesh also has not admitted the entrance of Bangladeshis into Indian dominion. The Government of India has raised the question of illegal entrance many times. But the Government of India has not yet given any clear explanation regarding infiltration. Therefore, when it is 70,00,000 according to Indian foreign office it is one crore, according to Jyoti Basu, the former Chief Minister of Northeastern Indian State, West Bengal (WB).

On the other hand, on 6th May, 1997, Indian Union Home Minister Indrajit Gupta (Communist Party Member of Parliament – CPI) disclosed to the Indian Parliament that there are upwards of 1 crore illegal Bangladeshi infiltrators, who have made India their quintessential home.

But, when the Budhhadev Bhattacharyay, the present chief minister of Indian WB State Government (led by left Front Party) agreed to the proposal or plan of pushing back illegal Bangladeshi infiltrators, at that time the other leaders of the party started an uproar against it. Because, the party and their leaders think that they will lose the ‘support’ of the illegal Bangladeshi nationals, who help them to get the ‘power’ of the state. In this connection, it may be remembered here that the Indian State (WB)’s Left Front Government has been traditionally soft on the illegal entry of Bangladeshis for political reasons.

In fact, the percentage of Hindu population has reduced, while the Muslim population grew in the same period. These are known facts, but some Indian politicians like Mannan Hossaain, Member of Parilament (MP) belongs to CPI (M) party of the constituency, Murshidabad District of Northeast Indian State, WB either says that they are not aware of such illegal migration or prefer ‘silence’ on this burning issue. It is true that the demographic composition has been changed in the Indian State.

It is irrefutable that a Muslim tidal wave is sweeping through the International Border districts of Northeast Indian States – Assam, WB, Tripura, Meghalaya and also inundating a few districts of Bihar (eastern part), where the growth rate of the Muslims is more than double and triple in some particular areas. It can’t be explained as generational escalation.

Former Indian Chief Election Commissioner, Mr. T. N. Sheshan was quoted in The New York Times (12th February, 1995) as saying that ‘there are still more than one million migrants on the electoral-rolls of Assam’. A study conducted by the American Academy of Arts & Science, Harvard & Toronto University shows that of the total inhabitants counted in the Eastern Indian State, Assam, one third are Bangladeshi immigrants. According to the research team indicates that 20 millions Bangladeshis are at present in India out of which 20 lakhs came in 1971 alone.

It is strange that in a country, where population growth is too high, more than 6 million voters were found decreasing within the span of 4 years or so. It automatically indicates that these 6 million and the increased number of voters during these four years plus the de-franchised 20 lakhs have infiltrated to India and abroad.

In a review made by the United Nations Organization (UNO), Bangladesh should have had a population of 118 million in 1991, but CRB showed about 108 millions population in that year; where did 10 million Bangladeshis go? Moreover, in 1951, Bangladesh had 22% (per cent) minority population, which by now has become almost half, in fact; it has come down to 10% (per cent) in 1995; what happened to this population? Either they crossed the international border and entered into India or they were annihilated surreptitiously.

Reports received across the border indicates that no trace of about 5 lakhs ‘Bihari-Muslim’ of Bangladesh was found in 1991. This apart, thousands of Hindu minorities were simply annihilated in the 1992 upsurge.

The infiltration arithmetic can now be summed up : (In Millions)
A. Infiltration up to 1991-(based on UNO observation) – 10.00
B. Bangladeshis are at present in India
(Based on American Academy of Arts & Science,

Havard & Toronto University)

– 20.00
C. Less number of voters shown in 1995 Electoral Roll, Bangladesh
(Based on Election Commission of Bangladesh)
– 6.00
D. De-franchised voters in 1995 Electoral Roll, Bangladesh
(Based on Election Commission of Bangladesh)
– 2.00
E. Population growth during the 04 years span (approximately)
(Based on Election Commission of Bangladesh)
– 2.00
F. Bangladeshi people are missing from Bangladesh country-

(Report of United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA])

– 1.41
Grand Total = 41.41

“We have definite information (of the Indian Intelligence Bureau-IIB) that between 7 to 9 million Bangladeshi foreign nationals have been illegally not only migrated but also registered into India”, claims well-known author-cum-foreign secretary of India, J. N. Dixit.

“There are as many as 15 to 20 lakhs Bangladeshi illegal infiltrators entered into India during the period of 1971 to 1999. All over India, yearly 3 lakhs illegal Bangladeshi nationals crossed the Indo-Bangla international boundary and reached Indian territory for permanent settlement in the North-Eastern States like Assam, Mizoram, Tripura, Meghalaya, West-Bengal and it’s adjoining areas”, states the Joint Secretary of Indian Home Ministry, Mr. G. K. Pillai, when he visited the Indo-Bangladesh international border on 18th August, 1999 at Southern Assam’s Karimganj and Hailakandi districts respectively, while in the year, 2001, Indian Home Ministry estimate prepared says, “Approximately, 150 lakhs to 170 lakhs Bangladeshi infiltrators have crossed into India illegally since 1971”.

However, on 14th July, 2004, in a written reply to a question in the Rajya Sabha/Lok Sabha of India, the former Union Minister of State for Home Affairs, Sriprakash Jaiswal stated that out of 1,20,53,950 illegal Bangladeshi infiltrators in the entire India. 50,00,000 Bangladeshi nationals are present in the Eastern Indian State of Assam as on December 31st, 2001, while another Northeastern Indian State, West Bengal tops in the list with 57,00,000 Bangladeshi immigrants. Not only that in Eastern Indian States like Arunachal Pradesh has 800 numbers, 30,000 numbers in Meghalaya, 59,500 numbers in Nagaland, 03,25,400 numbers in Tripura, except Manipur and Mizoram respectively. It has estimated by the Indian Home Ministry, on the basis of Intelligence Bureau (IB) report (See Table or Chart).

“More than 04 lakhs illegal Bangladeshi infiltrators are existed into the Guwahati, capital city of Northeastern Indian state of Assam”, peg the officials of the International Border Police Force of India (Assam State Division). Where these Bangladeshis live in India? In this context, the Indian Border Security Force (IBSF) has suggested to the Government of India that the Indian State Government of Assam should undertake special census operation in the sensitive areas in this matter.

Therefore, from all these clearly show that the position of indigenous people of North-East India has been gradually decreasing. At present, North-East India is known as the land of the ‘Eight-Sisters’ (Assam, Arunachal Pradesh, Mizoram, Meghalaya, Manipur, Tripura, Nagaland and Sikkim). In this case, these Bangladeshis are dispersed in these eight states including the State, West Bengal and Bihar.

At present, in India, the trump card for wining any election in 20 to 25 Parliamentary Constituency (PC)s and in 120 to 125 Assembly Constituency (AC)s of the various component States, such as : Assam, West Bengal, Bihar, Maharashtra and even, Delhi lie in the hands of the illegal Muslim Bangladeshi foreigners. If this situation continues for another 10 years, at least, the candidates of 50 PCs and 250 ACs will have to depend of the blessings of these so-called illegal Bangladeshi infiltrators.

Similarly, with the geometric rise of the population of the said community, leaders from that community have become powerful and important in the Eastern Indian state, Assam. Because, out of 27 districts in the State, 07 districts (Barpeta, Goalpara, Dhubri, Morigaon, Nagaon, Karimganj and Hailakandi) are Muslim population majority, where illegal Bangladeshis are lived.

As a result, by 2010 to 2015, out of 126 ACs, about 54 ACs of the State, Assam would be dominated by Bangladeshi Muslim Voters that would one day not only pose a serious threat to socio-cultural identity and stability but also may be in a position to form their Government and they will make their own Chief Minister (CM) of the State, while according to the Indian Home Ministry estimates, as many as 40 to 46 out of 126 Acs in the State, Assam are assessed to be dominated by Illegal Bangladeshi nationals.

On the other hand, due to the unabated illegal Bangladeshi Muslim nationals have growing by leaps and bound of another North East Indian State, West Bengal, which will be the principal factor within next five to ten years. As a result of this, the people of the said state will soon loss their majority and ethnicity. Already, out of 294 ACs of the said state, Bangladeshi Muslim intruders or voters are in a position to decisively influence over 52 ACs, which play a crucial role in 100 others seats also.

Even, the number of Member of Legislative Assembly (MLA) seats in the said WB state has increased (like Murshidabad District, who had earlier 19 MLA seats, presently, 22 MLA seats) in the constituency delimitation exercise. Because, the illegal movement of Bangladeshi Muslim infiltrators into the Indian State has already created the socio-political dimension.

Therefore, most causing anxiety is that no party or leader in the country (that is, in the states as well as central) can now dream of coming to power without the support of the illegal Bangladeshi Muslim population.

But, no one has raised question how and why this has happened? Still the illegal Bangladeshi infiltrators haunting the Northeast Indian States – Assam, West Bengal, Meghalaya, Tripura and the Mizoram, Nagaland, Manipur and Arunachal Pradesh simultaneously. It has ultimately proved, when on 23rd July, 2008, the honourable Gauhati High Court of the Indian State, Assam declares, “Bangladeshis have become the kingmakers in the Eastern Indian State, Assam”. Reacting to the 95-pages judgment (disposing of a bunch of petitions filed by the 61 persons, declared as illegal foreign nationals [read illegal Bangladeshi infiltrators] by various foreigner’s tribunals) of the justice B. K. Sharma of Gauhati High Court of Northeast India’s State, Assam, the All Assam Student’s Union (AASU) says, “The open India-Bangladesh International Border is not only become a ‘corridor’ for the incessant flood of illegal Bangladeshi nationals from the former East Bengal, known as – East Pakistan, presently Bangladesh to the Eastern Indian States in the early 20th century but also convert into a ‘safe passage’ for the militants of the fanatic pan-Islamic religious fundamentalism to India.

Though, it was the Liberation War of the nation, Bangladesh, which had ignited a flow of mass migration of the populaces from the East Bengal, that is, East Pakistan (of the pre-independent era), but, the Government of India has totally failed to arrest the situation. Even, the Government of India has failed to make sure that the illegal Bangladeshi nationals have gone back to their newborn nation”.

In India, in this context, it is AASU, who has taken the initiative seriously, specially in the year, 1979, during the revision of the Voter’s List in the Mongaldoi Loksabha Constituency of the Darrang district of the Northeast Indian State, Assam (which was preparing for a by-election at that time) that the concerned department identified a large scale Bangladeshi nationals having enlisted themselves as electorates in the Electoral Roll.

According to the reports revealed by the several Indian Intelligence Agency (IIA)s are concerned that after the apprehensions of the unscrupulous elements among the several hundreds of illegal Bangladeshi Muslim families, who have disclosed that Bangladesh Defence Rifles (BDR) is actively involved in trying to push the poor Muslim Bangladeshi families into India due to very much poverty in their own country, and this is why, the families have fled from their own country and always tried to infiltrate into India illegally, who have now been created not only disturbances and undermine the communal harmony but also destabilize the situation in India seriously.

These unabated Bangladeshi illegal infiltrators are mostly entered into India during the regime of Begum Khaleda Zia, when she was Prime Minister of Bangladesh and Major General Fazlur Rahman, when he was Director General of Bangladesh Defence Rifles (BDR), BDR, both are instigated in trying to push the Bangladeshi infiltrators into India every now and then, directly and indirectly in different times and in different reasons.

Reacting on the IIAs report, the former Indian Deputy Prime Minster as well as the Home Minister, Lal Krishna Advani justifies, “Whatever our IIAs are claimed are cent per cent true. The Bangladeshi infiltrators illegally enter into Northeast Indian States through the porous India-Bangladesh International Border and deprive indigenous people of their respective lands and livelihoods, which lead to insurgency in the region.

On the other hand, “The anti-ULFA (United Liberation Front of Asam) attitude of the Bangladesh Government had infuriated Mr. Paresh Baruah, the ULFA Chief, who later on as a retaliation of the same said in an interview to British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) from his hideout, that if the Bangladesh Government took an anti-ULFA line, the Assam’s insurgent group of North-East India would target the lakhs of people of ‘Bangladesh Origin’ in Assam”, reveals well-known journalist of Dhaka, Bangladesh, Haroon Habib on 28th May, 1997.

It is more so if both these countries have their population from the same or common stock. In case of India and Pakistan, more specifically India and East-Pakistan turned Bangladesh, where partition was made over-night, the land was divided, not the people at the time of partition, as landed properties and relatives of people of both the countries were across the borders. Still lots of Indian have their relatives in Bangladeshi and vice-versa. This factor makes Bangladeshi infiltration to India much more easy and natural. But, if the people consider the volume of infiltration, the people of North-Eastern States constrained to think that behind such huge quantity of infiltration, there must be far deeper reason besides the economic reason.

There is indeed infiltration from other neighbouring countries too. From Nepal and Bhutan in the North and from Mayanmar (that is, Burma) in the east sporadic infiltration are there; but with the exception of Nepal, infiltration from the other two countries are negligible. The infiltration from Nepal, though more compared to Bhutan and Burma, is yet negligible compared to Bangladeshi infiltration.

Besides economic reason, there are other reasons, far deep and sinister, which work behind the infiltration from Bangladesh. Some of these reasons can be termed as political, some as economic, some as religious and some as purely subversive.

According to the Indian Census Report, most of the Bangladeshi illegal immigrants are the people of very poor section of Bangladesh. Therefore, they often enter into India and settle themselves either temporarily or permanently in the Dhubri, Goalpara, Barpeta, Morigaon, Nagaon, Karimganj, Hailakandi, Cachar, Sonitpur, Jorhat districts of Northeastern Indian state Assam and Coochbehar, North-Dinajpur (the then East-Dinajpur), Maldaha, Murshidabad districts of Northeastern Indian state, West Bengal (WB) with a view to earning something to keep themselves alive. In this context, Centre for Research in Indo-Bangladesh Relations (CRIBR) points out that the districts of the said two states have been dominated by the religious minority community.

On the other side, the river-island or sandy-shore (locally called Char) of the red river Brahmaputra and its tributaries, the ‘traditional immigrant sanctuaries’ are found largely inhabitant by the illegal Bangladeshi infiltrators, who don’t even, pay any revenue to the Indian State Government, Assam. Further, due to transience of these char-lands, the thousands of square kilometres of char-region have mentioned as non-cadastral-lands in the revenue record of the Assam Government. But, the interesting fact is that the State Government does not register most of the chars, why nobody knows.

However, according to the estimate or of Indian Assam State Intelligence Bureau Report of 1993-1994, a lot of riverine basins have sprung up between the river Brahmaputra and it’s tributaries. These chars are existed from Sadia of Upper Assam’s Dibrugarh district to South-Salmara of Lower Assam’s Dhubri district of the state, Assam in North-East India, while according to the estimate of Char Area Development Authority, Government of Assam State (India) – CADAGAS(I), there are 1,256 char on the river Brahmaputra (this figure was shown in the year, 1985).

According to the Indian Military Intelligence Report, “Of total number of 2,089 chars, lie under 14 Districts, 23 Sub-divisions and 59 Development Blocks with 02,251 villages in 299 Gaon-Panchaet (that is, village panchaet)s the whole state. Over 24.90 lakhs people (of them 12.72 lakhs male and 12.18 lakhs females, comprising 04.35 lakhs families of which 02.95 lakhs are very needy, that is, live below poverty line) reside in the chars of the river Brahmaputra and it’s tributaries and the density of population per square kilometer in char areas is 690 numbers, while 03,068 square kilometers area belongs to char areas in the Eastern Indian State, Assam. Most of the people are of ‘Muslim Community’ (specially indicate the ‘Religious Minority Muslim People, who reside in basically western part of the said State and are basically needy and migrated from Bangladesh time-to-time in search of food, cloth and shelter) and 69% (per cent) to 70% (per cent) are live in below poverty line.

Although, the other report says that the total population of char region is 24.90 lakhs. Of this, 22.90 lakhs is ‘Muslim’ (that is, ‘Religious Minority’) and 01.50 lakh to 02.00 lakh is ‘Kalita-Nepali’, ‘Mising-Ahom’ and ‘Koch-Rajbongshi’ (that is, ‘Non-Muslim’) and others. Apart from this, more than 70% (per cent) to 75% (per cent) of char-village population is ‘Immigrant Muslim’ and the rest live in the town and other places permanently. Over and above, this vast tract of char-land from Sadia to Dhubri is largely inhabited by Muslim community, which according to the Government report is 80% (per cent) and the rest 20% (per cent) is the people of ‘Non-Muslim’ community.

Apart from these, the Government report has also disclosed that the people of immigrant Muslim section largely populate the char-lands. There are 90% (per cent) Muslim community in the districts like Dhubri, Goalpara, Barpeta, Kamrup, Nalbari, Darrang, Sonitpur, Nagaon and Morigaon and Sonitpur, (Mangaldoi) Darrang of Eastern Indian State, Assam are the noted riverine char-villages, where various sections of people like ‘Nepali’, ‘Boro’, ‘Bengali-Hindu’, ‘Fisherman’ (locally known as : Kaibarta) et cetera live together. Even, some noted tribe like ‘Missing’ community, which 50% (per cent) of total population in riverine char areas from (of ) Dhemaji district to Sonitpur district lives since long of the said state.

As a result of this, without any hindrance and fear the illegal Bangladeshi settlers come to settle themselves in these un-surveyed, unaccounted and un-policed char-lands. To observe and tackle the situation like, migration, smuggling and anti-Indian activities, the Border Security Force of India (BSFI) and International Border River Police Force of India (IBRPFI) have established a few International Border Observing Out Post (IBOOP) in the borderline char areas and for this region, the Bangladeshi migrants don’t crossing the border line easily. In fact, it is done by the so-called ‘tout’, who bring them from Bangladesh and hand over to the char-landlord (locally called Dewani or Matabbar) as against Rs. 50 to Rs. 100 per head, who bear all the responsibilities to protect them in return of their ‘vote’ to fight and win the election.

According to the opinions passed by the experts and the advisors, the infiltrators are of three types. Firstly : the people belong to the Hindu community came to India for fear of conversion, oppression and communal-riots, Secondly : the people of Bihari-muslim community, who don’t have political ideals came only for seeking jobs and Thirdly : the Bengali-Muslim community specially – farmers, vegetable-sellers, fish-sellers, rag-pickers, labourers, zari-workers, rickshaw-pullers (known as Rickshawala), hand-barrow-pullers (locally called Thelawala) and daily-wage-earners et cetera entered into India to enjoy a better life that is, food, cloth and shelter.

Although, nowadays, most of the Muslim Bangladeshis are adopted new kind of ‘strategy’ or ‘policy’ to hide themselves far from the eyes of the cops. Instead of jobs, they take professions either in cafeterias, hotels, restaurants, bars and souvenir shops or in small factories and others business establishments that have been situated out of the cities.

Not only that for a long time, Bangladeshi Muslims have tendency of immigrating out of their own country – Bangladesh, which they do both due to poverty and the population boom. But, the problems of the Bangladeshi Hindus are quite different and it should be solved by Bangladesh Government, because, it is their (Bangladesh Government’s) moral duty. The Government of India should create pressure upon the Bangladesh Government diplomatically to solve the problem of the ‘Hindu migrants’, who were rather force to come here and whose property was confiscated as Enemy Properties Act. Even, many of them fear that they could be depriving of their landed property because of converting Bangladesh into an Islamic regime.

On the other hand, the Bihari-Muslims create another problem. It is humane. The 05 lakhs Bihari-Muslims in Bangladesh, who constitute a very crucial problem and United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) should come forward to solve this problem and make arrangement for resettlement of them and the problem related to others should have to be tackled separately.

Whatever the reasons behind the huge number of Bangladeshi national’s presence in India, observers said that the overall affect of their presence in India and in the Indian North-East region in particular is the shattering of the socio-economic balance in the region? The observers further said that the infiltrators not only occupied char areas in the ‘riverine-belt’, but also led to grow up unauthorized settlements in Government-lands, agricultural-lands, grazing reserves and forest areas by illegally felling forest products indiscriminately. This indiscriminate felling of trees ultimately resulted in environmental problems and destruction of the ‘ecological-balance’.

In the economic sphere too, the Bangladeshis grab, whatever avocation come by them and thereby enhancing the already deplorable un-employment problem in these states. Moreover, by managing to enter their names in the electoral-rolls in their zeal to remain within this country, the Bangladeshis have already turned the tide in their favour, at least in Assam and West Bengal.

As a result, it is fact that, today the situation in Assam is turning from bad to worse. The existence of huge number of illegal migrants and the continued influx of aliens have already instilled a sense of insecurity in the minds of the indigenous people. So, if the Government of India and its’ State Governments (specially, Assam and West Bengal) does not stop pretending that there is no foreigner in Eastern India and also at the same time if the detection and deportation of foreigners are not taken up speedily and seriously, the issue of foreign nationals would pose a major threat to the security of States as well as the entire North-East Indian region very soon.

So it is the time that the Government of India should take the matter sincerely and especially rescues the Northeast Indian region from the grasp of this menacing evil.

TABLE-I INDO-BANGLADESH INTERNATIONAL BORDER

PILLAR NUMBER AREA

(Kms)

A. West-Bengal (India) & Bangladesh 0001 to 1001 2,217.70
B. Assam (India) & Bangladesh 1001 to 1067 262.00
C. Meghalaya (India) & Bangladesh 1067 to 1338 443.00
D. Tripura (India) & Bangladesh 1338 to 1397 (North)

1397 to 2250 (South)

856.00
E. Mizoram (India) & Bangladesh 2301 to 2358 318.00
TOTAL Indo-Bangladesh International Border 0001 to 2358 04,096.70
Source : Border Security Force of India.
TABLE-II ILLEGAL BANGLADESHIs IN INDIA
SERIAL

NUMBER

STATE/COUNTRY DISTRICT/AREA BANGLADESHIs
IN INDIA
01. ASSAM DHUBRI, BARPETA, KAMRUP, NAGAON, KARIMGANJ, MORIGAON, BONGAIGAON, KOKRAJHAR & DARRANG 67,00,300
02. ARUNACHAL PRADESH PANPUPARE 1,080
03. MIZORAM 39
04. BIHAR BHAGALPUR, SAMASTIPUR, KATIHAR, SAHEBGANJ, KISHANGANJ, ARARIA, PAKUR, PURNIA & GAYA 6,41,396
05. NAGALAND KOHIMA, DIMAPUR, TENSANG, MON, MOKOKCHANG, BOKHA, JHUNEBOTO & FEK 79,800
06. MEGHALAYA FULBARI, RAJABALA, PIPULBARI, MAHENDRAGANJ, HELEDIGANJ (WEST GARO HILLS DISTRICT) 40,518
07. TRIPURA WEST-TRIPURA, NORTH-TRIPURA & SOUTH-TRIPURA 4,44,867
08. WEST-BENGAL (WB) COOCHBEHAR, JALPAIGURI, DARJEELING, NORTH-DINAJPUR, SOUTH-DINAJPUR, MURSHIDABAD, MALDAHA, SOUTH-24-PARGANS, NORTH-24-PARGANAS, HOWRAH, NADIA & KOLKATA 76,80,122
09. ORISSA KENDRAPARA, BHADRAK, JAGATSINGHAPUR, BALESHWAR, KHARDA, GANJAM, RAIGARH, MAYURBHANJ & SAMBHALPUR 41,670
10. ANDAMAN & NICOBAR ISLAND ANDAMAN 4,050
11. DELHI SELAMPUR, SEEMAPURI, JAMUNAPUSTHA, GANDHI NAGAR, SAHID NAGAR, KRISHNA NAGAR, TULSINIKETAN, GEETA COLONY, KHUREJI, SASHI GARDEN, DILSHAD GARDEN, BHAJANPUR (The Interstate Border between Delhi [East] and Uttar Pradesh (UP) 5,02,366
12. MADHYA PRADESH (MP) DEBAS, SARGUJA, MONDSAUR, SIBNI, KORBA 950
13. MAHARASHTRA THANE, MUMBAI, PUNE, GARCHIROLI, GONDIA 28,089
14. PUNJAB MALERKOTLA, PATIALA, MOHALI, CHANDIGARH 345
15. HARYANA PANIPATH, FATEHABAD, GURGAON, ROHTAK, FARIDABAD 800
16. GUJARAT JAMNAGAR, KACHH, BANASKANTHA, PORBANDAR 150
17. RAJASTHAN NAGAUR, BARMER, JAISILMAR, AJMER, BIKANIAR, JOYPUR, ALWAR, BARAT, RAJSAMUND 447,150
18. KARNATAKA 15
19. HIMACHAL PRADESH (HP) 25
20. JAMMU & KASHMIR
(J & K)
480
21. UTTAR PRADESH
/UTTAR ANCHAL
ALLAHABAD, MIRJAPUR, DEBARIA, JONEPUR, FAIZABAD, GAZIPUR, AJAMGARH, GORAKHPUR, CHANDOULI, MEERUT, BARANASHI, GAZIABAD, KANPUR, HAMIRPUR, LUCKHNOW, MAHARAJGANJ, SAHARANPUR, BIJNAUR, BAREILI, BAHARAICH, MURADABAD, J. B. NAGAR, RAIBAREILI,

HAIDWAR, DEHRADUN, SANT RABIDAS NAGAR

34,874
Total INDIA 16,649,086

Source : Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of India
(Note : According to the Home Ministry, Government of India, Report – December 31, 1995 & December 31, 2001, the Bangladeshi are living in India now.)

TABLE-III (A)

POPULATION PATTERN IN NORTHEAST INDIA

Serial

Number

State/Country

Year

1901

Year

1911

Year

1921

Year

1931

Year

1941

Year

1951

01. Sikkim 59,014 81,721 01,09,808 01,21,520 01,37,725
02. Arunachal Pradesh
03. Assam 32,89,680 46,36,980 55,60,371 66,94,790 80,28,856
04. Tripura 01,73,325 03,04,437 03,82,450 05,13,010 06,39,029
05. Meghalaya 03,40,524 04,22,403 04,80,837 05,55,820 06,05,674
06. Mizoram 82,434 98,406 01,24,404 01,52,786 01,96,202
07. Manipur 02,84,465 03,84,016 04,45,606 05,12,069 05,77,635
08. Nagaland 01,01,550 01,58,801 01,78,844 01,89,641 02,12,975
09. West Bengal 01,69,40,088 01,74,74,348 01,88,97,036 02,32,29,552 02,62,99,980
Total NORTH-EAST INDIA 02,12,71,080 02,35,61,112 02,61,79,356 03,19,69,188 03,66,98,076

Source : Ministry of Statistics & Programme Implementation, Government of India.

TABLE-III (B)

POPULATION PATTERN IN NORTHEAST INDIA

Serial

Number

State/Country

Year

1961

Year

1971

Year

1981

Year

1991

Year

2001

01. Sikkim 01,62,189 02,09,843 03,16,385 04,06,457 05,40,851
02. Arunachal Pradesh 03,36,558 04,67,511 06,31,839 08,64,558 10,97,968
03. Assam 01,08,37,329 01,46,25,152 01,80,41,248 02,24,14,322 02,66,55,528
04. Tripura 11,42,005 15,56,342 20,53,058 27,57,205 31,99,203
05. Meghalaya 07,69,380 10,11,699 13,35,819 17,74,778 23,18,822
06. Mizoram 02,66,063 03,32,390 04,93,757 06,89,756 08,88,573
07. Manipur 07,80,037 10,72,753 14,20,953 18,37,149 23,88,634
08. Nagaland 03,69,200 05,16,449 07,74,930 12,09,546 19,88,636
09. West Bengal 03,49,26,279 04,43,12,011 05,45,80,647 06,80,77,965 08,01,76,197
Total NORTH-EAST INDIA 04,95,89,040 06,41,04,150 07,96,48,636 10,00,31,736 11,92,54,412

Source : Ministry of Statistics & Programme Implementation, Government of India.

TABLE-IV-A

AT A GLANCE

POPULATION PATTERN IN BANGLADESH

YEAR-1961

DIVISION MUSLIM HINDU BUDDHIST CHRISTIAN OTHERS TOTAL
BARISHAL 34,96,528 07,40583 12,278 12,378 42,61,727
CHATTAGRAM 01,08,48,603 23,92,757 03,58,469 20,477 09,344 01,36,29,650
DHAKA 01,26,69,746 25,29,751 01,030 77,649 15,420 01,52,93,596
KHULNA 41,20,771 16,67,437 345 15,258 01,322 58,05,133
RAJSAHI 97,54,833 20,49,141 01,745 23,141 21,229 01,18,50,089
BANGLADESH 04,08,90,481 93,79,669 03,73,867 01,48,903 47,315 05,08,40,235

YEAR-1974

DIVISION MUSLIM HINDU BUDDHIST CHRISTIAN OTHERS TOTAL
BARISHAL 45,85,977 08,28,778 04,38,917 05,326 02,580 54,27,132
CHATTAGRAM 01,58,94,223 22,62,207 04,471 28,898 23,532 01,86,35,902
DHAKA 01,86,66,035 25,17,135 04,27,042 01,13,568 15,665 02,13,15,630
KHULNA 69,20,825 18,23,189 03,227 17,639 05,621 87,67,816
RAJSAHI 01,49,71,870 22,41,738 542 50,488 63,537 01,73,31,268
BANGLADESH 06,10,38,929 96,73,048 04,38,917 02,15,919 01,10,935 07,14,77,748

YEAR-1981

DIVISION MUSLIM HINDU BUDDHIST CHRISTIAN OTHERS TOTAL
BARISHAL 56,08,657 08,78,503 04,158 15,824 02,439 65,09,581
CHATTAGRAM 01,93,52,848 26,31,041 05,24,610 40,699 46,390 02,25,95,588
DHAKA 02,35,23,894 25,54,426 04,743 01,20,923 27,756 02,62,31,742

KHULNA 85,20,107 20,67,516 01,204 46,346 08,350 01,06,43,523
RAJSAHI 01,84,81,474 24,38,759 03,616 50,689 01,64,993 02,11,39,531
BANGLADESH 07,54,86,980 01,05,70,245 05,38,331 02,74,481 02,49,928 08,71,19,965

YEAR-1991

DIVISION MUSLIM HINDU BUDDHIST CHRISTIAN OTHERS TOTAL
BARISHAL 65,74,525 08,66,039 04,657 14,996 02,426 74,62,643
CHATTAGRAM 02,37,36,002 28,77,745 05,74,528 55,350 44,322 02,72,87,947
DHAKA 02,97,86,106 26,56,708 20,430 01,54,514 48,217 03,26,65,975
KHULNA 01,06,08,358 20,29,857 02,492 38,262 09,414 01,26,88,383
RAJSAHI 02,31,76,038 27,48,517 21,303 82,940 01,81,246 02,62,10,044
BANGLADESH 09,38,81,029 01,11,78,866 06,23,410 03,46,062 02,85,625 10,63,14,992

(Note :Distribution of Bangladesh population by religious communities)

(Source :Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics, Government of Bangladesh)

TABLE-IV-B

VOTERS IN BANGLADESH

SERIALNUMBER YEAR TOTAL VOTER(In Numbers) MALE(In Numbers) FEMALE(In Numbers) DISTRICT/COUNTRY DATE OF END OF TERM
01. 1970 02,94,79,386 19
02. 1970 03,52,05,642 19 15.12.1972
03. 1973 03,87,89,239 02,00,34,717 01,87,54,522 19 06.11.1975
04. 1979 04,78,76,979 02,49,35,993 02,23,89,893 20 24.03.1982
05. 1986 04,98,63,829 02,63,79,944 02,34,83,885 64 06.12.1987
06. 1988 06,20,81,793 03,30,40,757 02,90,41,036 64 06.12.1990
07. 1991 05,61,49,182 64 24.11.1995
08. 1996 05,67,02,422 02,87,59,994 02,79,56,941 64 30.03.1996
09. 1996 07,49,46,368 03,85,30,414 03,62,93,441 64 13.07.2001
10. 2001
11. 2008
Total

Note : Impose of Martial Law in the years – 1975, 1982 and 2006 .

(Source :Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics, Government of Bangladesh)

TABLE-V

POPULATION OF BANGLADESH

SERIAL

NUMBER

YEAR

POPULATION

(In Million)

01. 1941 04,19,97,000
02. 1951 04,19,00,000
03. 1961
04. 1971 70,67,90,000
05. 1981 09,00,00,000
06. 1991 10,79,92,140/11,14,00,000
07. 2001
08. 2011

[Note -Population (including Voter) of Bangladesh in the others years : Year – 1972 – 72,53,50,000 million, in 1973 – 74,44,10,000 million, in 1974 – 76,39,80,000 million, in 1975 – 78,40,50,000 million, in 1985 – 10,04,680, in 1986 – 09,92,100, in 1987 – 10,10,500/10,41,00,000, in 1988 – 10,45,300, in 1989 – 10,48,400, in 1990 – 10,98,200, in 1992 – 11,28,32,000/11,44,00,000 million, in 1993 – 11,67,020, in 1994 – 11,77,870, in 1995 – 12,11,100 (Voter-06,21,81,745), in 1996 – 12,30,63,000/11,99,57,313 (Voter – 05,61,63,296), in 1997 – 12,36,330, in 1998 – 12,56,290, in 1999 – 12,76,690 and in 2000 – 12,91,942.]

(Source :Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics, Government of Bangladesh, Bangladesh Election Commission, Government of Bangladesh & Other Government & Non Government Organisations, agencies of Bangladesh).

References :

67. Livelihoods On Line At Indian Border – BBC News – Subir Bhaumik, dated 28th June, 2005.

68. Human Cost Of Dhaka-Delhi Row – BBC News – Subir Bhaumik, 05th February, 2003.

69. India Bangladesh Border Clash At Pyrdiwah – Anirban Roy – Hindustan Times, 17th April, 2001.

Shib Shankar Chatterjee is a former BBC, The Times of India, Hindustan Times, The Statesman & The Telegraph Contributor-cum-Correspondent from Northeast India, who specializes in investigations of important issues affecting the people of South Asia, specially, India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan & Myanmar.