Guadulesa Rivera: Exclusive Interview with the Cherokee Indian Fine Artist

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The following is Part 1 of an Exclusive Interview with Guadulesa Rivera by Bruce Edwin

Hollywood Sentinel: How did you get started as an artist?

Guadulesa Rivera: I’ve been drawn to the arts all my life. I studied drawing, painting and dance, when I was young. My father was a jazz musician and played alto sax. Through my family I became a jazz aficionado. We always had music in the home, and there were other visual artists and musicians in the family. As an adult, I settled into paint as my preferred method for expression.

Hollywood Sentinel: What is your training and background as an artist?

GUADULESAMOCA
www.Guadulesa.com

Teaching Art

Guadulesa Rivera: I studied formally in my early years, earning an Associate Degree in Studio Arts. There were older artists who helped to shape my path including Kanemitsu, Betye Saar, and Paul Jenkins. I began to exhibit my work and at the same time, I was drawn to work as a Scenic Artist. I painted sets for theatre, T.V, and film. Later, I coordinated the arts and cultural programming for a community-based organization in Boston. I taught at times, but managing and infusing the arts into programming for all ages kept me very busy. I ran a gallery and historic art center for children. All of these opportunities have shaped my career as an artist.

Hollywood Sentinel: Who are some of your favorite famous fine artists and why?

Abstract Expressionism

Guadulesa Rivera: I am drawn to the abstract expressionists. I like freedom of expression in art, because I am an emotional being. Franz Kline is one of my favorites, because he achieved a sense of space and structure. There is a balance between the emotional, intellectual and spiritual energies.

Hollywood Sentinel: Does one need to know color theory and perspective in order to be a great artist? Why or why not?

Guadulesa Rivera: In order to be a great artist, one has to approach the craft with every serious intention of presenting the best work possible. Studying the technical aspects of one’s craft is essential to developing a fluid language for the expression of ideas and feelings.