SwishZone Offers Easy to Use Alternative Flash Type Animation Tools

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Super Investing

As follow up to recent innovations in personal technology that everyday people use, again new software and hardware open the gates of our brand New Year.

Popular Australian software company SwishZone brings us new Swish Max2. Swish Zone serves the Internet by using what we commonly known as the program “Flash” basic platform, and simplifying its use. An average newbie can immediately begin building snazzy images with Swish Zone’s easy to understand, easy to use tutorials which include pre-made examples to work off of.

Swish, Quicker Than A Flash

For anyone who has struggled with Flash it’s nice to know there is an easier way to make your holiday and year 2011 website dance, sing, and for sure flash with this whiz-bang nifty joy-toy of choice.

Some years back while having a tough time with Macromedia Flash even after buying a third upgrade guaranteed to simplify the learning curve, I gave up after taking two local college courses because it was just too complex. Flash has always been a difficult program for the lay person to master. Then an alternative was discovered. It came with an easy to understand, thorough tutorials. To my amaze it didn’t come from Microsoft, or Macromedia, but from a small startup company in abroad.

After a quick install of a free trial copy I had animations with sound created, Oh Show Me The Easy Road.

SwishZone is the undisputed world leader in alternative Flash type animation tools. Their philosophy is founded on making the authoring of such animations accessible to everyone by providing simple to use tools.

Founded in 1999 Swish offers a entire range of products which grew from one single tool for animating text, to a suite of products that today easily create all manner of animations,

With some flash-based videos, music players, Swish Zone has now moved up to other power paks, the latest being professional level “Max3.”

Authoring tools with so much flexibility plus strength for Internet demands, has brought traffic to Swish. It has been downloaded more than 6.7 million copies of Max4 alone.

SwissZone today boasts more than 600,000 licenses across 327,000 customers as they grow by the minute. They register more than 1000 free trial activations per day demonstrating enormous interest better ways of net animation creation.

Although based in Sydney, Australia, SwishZone is represented by partner partners worldwide, including regional foreign language distributors that include Germany, Japan, France, Italy, Poland, Taiwan and China.

Today SwishZone is being used in over 200 countries.

The company has a loyal and active User Community that is well serviced by a combination of web sites:

SwishZone’s community portal hosts a large repository of freeware samples to support Swish applications where they receive 350,000 unique visitors per month.

I personally get a lot of mileage out of Swishzone forums, as well as free assistance from staff.

A software company that still supports its users. What’s wrong with these people? More U.S. corporations could take a lesson from that.

Beyond Apple

It has been reported that Apple is trying to pro-actively block Flash from its iPhone and Tablet. This is if true, a much tougher stance then simply not making it mobile available.

Also those apps must be submitted by an Apple approved Developer or cannot be sold in the App Store….

A SwishZone blogger found a snippet of code called Gordon written in Java which iPhone and Tablet can easily. That and more available as a exciting creative and perhaps financially lucrative way to kick off 2911 by hitting the SwishMax App Store for mobile or as SwishZone says, “To Create the Future is to Predict It.” http://www.swishzone.com

Claudia Strasbaugh was a freelance writer who founded Scripps Ranch/Mira Mesa Writer’s Guild, was head writer for the weekly TV show “Kill ‘EM With Comedy”, plus California Bureau Chief for National Lotto World Magazine. Claudia also ran a non profit called Dinner On A Dollar. Sadly, Claudia passed away in 2015, but we are pleased to display her writing works.