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Djelloul Marbrook

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Djelloul (jeh-lool) Marbrook, born in Algiers to a Bedouin father and an American painter grew up New York, served in the US Navy. His book of poems, Far From Algiers, won the Stan and Tom Wick Poetry Prize from Kent State University. His story, Artists Hill, won the Literal Latte first prize in fiction. He worked as a reporter for The Providence Journal and as an editor for The Elmira (NY) Star-Gazette, The Baltimore Sun, The Winston-Salem Journal & Sentinel and The Washington Star. Later he worked as executive editor of four small dailies in northeast Ohio and two medium-size dailies in northern New Jersey.

National Poetry Month is a Good Time to Ask Questions

National Poetry Month offers a moment to ask ourselves whether we're also celebrating dangerous, subversive, ball-breaking poetry. Or are we just celebrating safe, anecdotal, 'accessible' poetry?

‘Artemisia’s Wolf’: Novel About a Young Woman Who Rocks Her World

When lightning strikes Artemisia Cavelli it illuminates her world and its inhabitants in strange new ways. Prize-winning poet Djelloul Marbrook has written a novel in honor of some of the world's most memorable women-Artemisia Gentileschi

Pascale Petit Channels Frida Kahlo in Poems

Frida Kahlo painted with a unique brush. Now British poet Pascale Petit gives the great Mexican painter a unique voice in 52 poems that eerily resonate with Kahlo's vivid way of painting.

Sometimes Facebook is Like a Party: Too Loud, Too Big, Too...

(07, April is the birthday of the Internet. On this day in 1969, a Defense Department agency sent out a Request for Comments to scientists -RFCs as they are known-asking for ideas and methods that would eventually lead to the Internet.)
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Violent TV Images Won’t Let Sleeping Dogs Lie

Films and particularly the 8-11 prime-time television shows batter us with violent images that rile us up, trading on a horrid fascination with violence that for some of us is like the Stockholm Syndrome...

Ever Wonder Why The Jesse James Story is Always Modern?

Why is the Jesse James legend so enduring? Could it be because it speaks indelibly to our sense of being swindled? The press is part of this sense of being swindled because it hides the most important stories in plain sight.

An Abandoned Luncheonette Inspires a Sequence of Sonnets

Poetry isn't about recognition and the praise of readers, it's about saying one thing so essential that the world can no longer be imagined in its absence.Here are two poets whose work illustrates the point: Environmental scientist Paul Clemente a

You Won’t Forget ‘Nazareth, North Dakota,’ Any Time Soon

'Nazareth, North Dakota,' is a memorable story about unforgettable characters, from Roxy in a hopeless marriage to Dill, just out of prison and about to go in again, to the baby boy Sam a teenage beauty pageant winner leaves at Roxy's motel door.

Bees are Dying, Famine is Looming, But The Press is Obsessed...

The worldwide collapse of honey bee colonies threatens famine and yet the press pays it scant attention, treating it as an exotic feature story.

I Read Back to Front and Bottom Up, Says Prize-Winning Poet...

'I just don't trust the authorized version of anything,' he says, and reading the wrong way strips out whatever sanctimony there is in a piece of writing.

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